Safety at MRL

Our Number One Priority: Safety

MRL EXCEEDS INDUSTRY STANDARDS BY:

  • Performing visual inspection of the main line track at least 2 times per week.
  • Providing community-based first responder training free of charge.
  • Training over 900 first responders in the past three years.
  • Having emergency response equipment staged across the railroad.
  • Providing reports to the state Emergency Response Commission on a weekly basis that include projected crude train shipments and the expected route of the train.
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10
Assistant Roadmasters whose primary function is to visually inspect track
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28
Wayside Detectors including wheel impact, hot wheel, wide load & dragging equipment
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5X/YEAR
Rail Detector Inspections
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245
Employees on tracks daily

DEDICATED TO SAFETY – EVERYDAY
We strive to make our company accident and injury free by developing a strong safety culture that generates recognition, control and elimination of potential hazards, as well as facilitating an environment where each person within our company shares in safety success. We are constantly searching for ways to better understand all aspects of safety in our industry and what steps must be taken to achieve our ultimate goal: zero accidents, zero injuries.

Stay Off. Stay Away. Stay Alive.

RAIL ROAD PROPERTY IS PRIVATE PROPERTY Trespassing on Rail Road property is not only extremely dangerous, it’s illegal. Climbing on or accessing trains or tracks is a serious security violation. Please don’t do it – ever.

SEE TRACKS? THINK TRAIN.

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1. No Selfies! Photos on train tracks are deadly and illegal. Never ever assume a track is inactive.

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2. Only cross at designated crossings. Crossing tracks outside of designated areas is dangerous and illegal.

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3. Never hunt, fish or jump from trestles. There is only enough clearance on the tracks for the train to pass.

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4. Any time is train time. Trains don’t follow set schedules and can come from either direction.

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5. Slow down, look and listen. It takes trains a mile or more to stop; trying to beat the train is not worth the risk.

OPERATION LIFESAVER

OPERATION LIFESAVER Operation Lifesaver is an international, non-profit education and awareness program. MRL employs Operation Lifesaver trained and certified volunteer speakers who provide free safety presentations for various professions and for all age groups in an effort to increase public safety around railroad tracks. Presentations are typically an hour in length and can be tailored to the audience, whether it be a kindergarten class or log truck drivers. To request a presentation, please get in touch!

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EDUCATION

The program seeks to educate both drivers and pedestrians to make safe decisions at crossing and around railroad tracks.

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ENFORCEMENT

Operation Lifesaver promotes active enforcement of traffic laws relating to crossing signs, signals and private property laws related to trespassing.

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ENGINEERING

Operation Lifesaver encourages continued engineering research and innovation to improve the safety of railroad crossings.

Safety of Cargo

BUILDING TOMORROWS RAIL ROAD TODAY
To keep freight moving safely every component of our roadway – from ballast to bridges – undergoes continual improvement. Since inception, 287 of the 306 bridges along the MRL line have been reconstructed, and its 900 miles of rail are being constantly replaced. We are proud to serve as business partners in building and enduring and reliable rail service.

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

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Hazardous materials account for a small percentage of shipments at MRL, but are critical for national defense, agriculture and public health. MRL has highly trained hazmat technicians on staff at key locations across our system to ensure safety shipping of these materials through the communities in which we operate.

single-car

99.99%

of rail cars containing hazardous materials arrive at their destination safely.

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39% SINCE 1990

the hazardous material accident rate drop.

semi-truck

16X

safer than trucks carrying hazardous materials

DID YOU KNOW
Unlike all other modes of transportation, railroads are required by the federal government to transport hazardous materials, whether railroads want to or not.

(Source: Association of American Railroads 2/10)