About MRL

All About Montana Rail Link

BASED IN MISSOULA, Montana Rail Link (MRL) is a Class II regional railroad that operates over 900 route miles of track in Montana and Idaho and employs nearly 1,200 dedicated professionals. MRL services over 150 local Montana businesses and moves their products to domestic and international markets on a daily basis. MRL remains committed to providing transportation services that result in long-term growth and prosperity for the company, and its customers and employees. MRL professionals live by the values of fairness, integrity, respect, safety and trust. MRL is committed to the safety of all employees, the general public, its customers, and to being a good neighbor in the communities it serves. As a BNSF partner, its rail shipments help feed, clothe, supply and power American and international homes and businesses every day.

REGIONAL RAILROADS SPECIALIZING IN PERSONALIZED SHORT-LINE SERVICE

Annual Traffic

20.1
Average # of Trains per Day
420,000
Total Carloads of Freight
57,000
Montana Goods Shipments
MRL Stats

MONTANA RAIL LINK AT A GLANCE

tracks Created with Sketch.
937
Route Miles
people
1,200
Employees
dollar-bill
$80 M
Payroll & Profit Sharing
page
$10 M
Property Taxes Paid
map-montana
$85 M
Montana Goods/Services Purchased
giving
$1/4+ B
Corporate Giving

The Green Choice

FUN FACT: if just 10% of long-haul freight now being moved by truck moved by rail instead, national fuel savings would exceed one billion gallons a year and annual greenhouse gas emissions would drop by more than 12 million tons. That’s equivalent to taking 2 million cars off the road or planting 280 million trees.

locomotive
25
Fuel efficient state-of-the-art green locomotives
gas-can
457
Average number of miles a freight train can move a ton of freight on a single gallon of fuel
semi-truck
4
Number of times railroads are, on average, more fuel efficient than trucks
globe
350
Number of truck loads a single freight train can take off the road, equivalent to 1,100 cars

DID YOU KNOW railroads have a “common carrier” obligation to carry hazardous materials. That means that, unlike all other modes of transportation, railroads are required by the federal government to transport these materials.